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  1. The Mousetrap

    Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap is the world's longest running play. The iconic neon sign at the front of St Martin's Theatre welcomes theatregoers and announces the longevity of the play. The play originally opened in London's West End on 25th November 1952. Each year as the production celebrates its anniversary the sign is changed. I decided to along  this year and here are a few photos I took.

  2. From time to time I write guest blogs for other websites, here's a complete list:

    Top Picks for London Heritage Hot Spots (February 2017)

    She Doesn't Even Hide It for Please Offer Me A Seat (November 2016) a personal blog about my disability following my accident and please check out the other blog posts too

    A Visit to Agatha Christie's Grave for Cemetery Club (15 September 2016)

    Bereavment - Finding My Way Through for Cemetery Club  (11 May 2016 ) an extremely personal one about bereavement following the death of my dad 

    The Five Signatories (& An English Man) for Cemetery Club (15 February 2016)

    Putting the Rave in Grave:  Death Salon in Philadelphia for Cemetery Club (26 October 2015)

    Marylebone Q&A Guide for Randomly London (December 2014)

    The Most Haunted Places in London for Lastminute.com (October 2014)

    Postman's Park Podcast for London Undone (April 2014)

    Postman's Park for Cemetery Club (17 February 2014)

    Westminster Libraries and me for Westminster Libraries (8 February 2013) 

    The author of this blog is a qualified City of London and City of Westminster Tour Guide who leads guided walks combining world famous landmarks with hidden treasures often missed by the crowds.  

  3. Edith Cavell War memorial Swardeston

    The war memorial in Swardeston, Norfolk, is rather special. A simple, granite stone Celtic cross has the name Edith Cavell at the top of the list of villagers who lost their lives in World War I (1914 - 1919). Nurse Edith Cavell was executed on 12th October 1915, by a German firing squad during World War I, for her role in assisting over 200 soldiers to escape from occupied Belgium. I visited Swardeston, the village where Edith was born and spent her childhood and taken on a walking tour by Nick Miller, Edith Cavell expert and author, to see the locations that were significent to Edith.

  4.  17

    The Parlour at Fornum and Mason

    Fortnum and Mason is world renowned as a luxury grocery shop. However for the discerning visitor, who can manage to drag themselves away from their beautifully presented food hall, they will be rewarded with a delightful treat The Parlour, a traditonal ice cream parlour.

  5. Ritz

    The Ritz

    One of my favourite things to do in London is to go for afternoon tea, a delicious meal consisting of sandwiches, scones and pastries. It is often considered to be one of the quintessential British experiences. Many cafes and tea shops offer this traditional service, but for the ultimate treat I would recommend enjoying it in the glamour and sumptuous surroundings of a luxury hotels.

  6. Pudding Club

    The Pudding Club was founded in 1985 to celebrate traditional British puddings. Each meeting offers a choice of 7 different puddings for an informal evening of sheer (over) indulgence, fun and British eccentricity! The weekly meetings are held at the Three Ways House Hotel in Mickleton village in the picturesque Cotswolds, UK. Attendance is open to everyone but pre-booking is required.   

  7.  Christ Church Hall

    Oxford, with its world famous university, is only about 50 miles/ 80km from London and is easily doable as a day trip. During the vacation period many colleges rent out their rooms to the public, it's a great opportunity to stay somewhere very unique and historic, so I booked a two night stay at Christ Church, Oxford's largest college. To be honest I wasn't sure what to expect but it exceeded my expectations and I loved every minute of my stay there. 

  8.  Flying Scotsman

    The Flying Scotsman returned to service on Thursday 25 February 2016, following a £4.2 million restoration. Scheduled to leave London King's Cross for York at 7.40am, I felt totally privileged to be there and wave her off. A huge Thank You to the National Railway Museum in York for leading the campaign to save this magnificent locomotive. Here are a few photos of an unforgettable day. Enjoy!